Language Practice in Great Britain

Wokingham: +44(0)1189776532

Our office

01189776532
07545492740

Tricorne House, 15 Sandy Lane, Wokingham, Berkshire, RG41 4DD

Great combination of language practice and daily excursions!

Excursions

Unique, traditional, cutting edge, refreshing, imaginative, surprising… Whatever you're looking for there are so many things to do in UK countries and cities.

There are many great places to visit in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Exciting cities, historic places rich in heritage, stunning countryside and beautiful coastlines. There are UK holiday destinations to suit everyone. Find out where to go in Britain with our guide to the best places to visit in the UK!

Pictures from our previous trips to England

Want to go next time with us and also to have fun?

Book your trip and we will gladly show you much more!

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Where we live  

Our residence

  • Sandy Lane Residence

The accommodation is located in a spacious country house in the small town of Wokingham in the county of Berkshire, 30 miles from London.

Sightseeing in London 

  • Обзорная экскурсия по Лондону/ London sightseeing
  • Стоунхендж /Stonehenge
  • Лондонский Тауер / Tower of London
  • Музей естествознания/ Natural History Museum
  • Музей науки/ Science Museum
  • Хемптон Корт/Hampton Court
  • Музей Лондона/ London Museum
  • Национальная галерея / National Gallery
  • Ковент Гаден/ Covent Garden
  • Музей Банка/ Bank Museum
  • Королевский ботанический сад /Kew Gardens
  • Колесо обозрения /London Eye
  • Музей Виктории и Альберта/ Victoria & Albert Museum
  • Британский Музей/ British Museum
  • Поездка в Оксфорд/ Oxford* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)
  • Поездка в Бат/ Bath* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)
  • Поездка в Стратфорд на Ейвоне/ Stratford on Avon* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)

The correct name for the Houses of Parliament is the Palace of Westminster, which was built in 1040 by Edward the Confessor and was the main Royal residence in London until Henry VIII moved to Whitehall. The present building dates from the 1800's and took 20 years to complete. It was built by Charles Barry, who is buried in Westminster Abbey. It is the largest Gothic building in the world - there are over 1,000 rooms and two miles of corridors in it. In the centre stands Westminster Hall, the only part of the original building that survives. Many great treason trials have taken place in Westminster. In 1305, Braveheart was sentenced to death here and in 1606 Guy Fawkes, the man who tried to blow up Parliament, met a similar fate. It is possible to visit the public gallery of the Houses of Parliament for free (although you will have to pass security checks and may have to queue a while). Did You Know? Though many people think Big Ben is the name of the tower with the famous clockface, it is actually the name of the bell within it. Big Ben is named after the Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall, who was in charge of construction of the clock. He was heavily criticised by politicians over the problems he had in building it. The bell's familiar ring is caused by a crack which appeared in 1859, within a few months of the bell being installed. The bell was re-cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry Company but soon cracked again. It has never been repaired. When the light above Big Ben is illuminated, Parliament is sitting. with your back to Big Ben, stop and face the square.

The correct name for the Houses of Parliament is the Palace of Westminster, which was built in 1040 by Edward the Confessor and was the main Royal residence in London until Henry VIII moved to Whitehall. The present building dates from the 1800's and took 20 years to complete. It was built by Charles Barry, who is buried in Westminster Abbey. It is the largest Gothic building in the world - there are over 1,000 rooms and two miles of corridors in it. In the centre stands Westminster Hall, the only part of the original building that survives. Many great treason trials have taken place in Westminster. In 1305, Braveheart was sentenced to death here and in 1606 Guy Fawkes, the man who tried to blow up Parliament, met a similar fate. It is possible to visit the public gallery of the Houses of Parliament for free (although you will have to pass security checks and may have to queue a while). Did You Know? Though many people think Big Ben is the name of the tower with the famous clockface, it is actually the name of the bell within it. Big Ben is named after the Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall, who was in charge of construction of the clock. He was heavily criticised by politicians over the problems he had in building it. The bell's familiar ring is caused by a crack which appeared in 1859, within a few months of the bell being installed. The bell was re-cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry Company but soon cracked again. It has never been repaired. When the light above Big Ben is illuminated, Parliament is sitting. with your back to Big Ben, stop and face the square.

The Abbey was built by Edward the Confessor, and William the Conqueror was crowned in it on Christmas Day 1066. Thousands of people are buried, or have their ashes interred, in it. Many others have plaques. Those buried in the Abbey include * Royalty - Henry III, Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, James I, Charles II * Politicians - Pitt the Younger, Pitt the Elder, Chamberlain, Gladstone * Poets and Writers - Chaucer, Jonson, Browning, Tennyson In 1997, the funeral service for Diana, Princess of Wales was held there. (Though she is not buried in the Abbey.) Did You Know? One person buried in the Abbey has three separate monuments. He was John Broughton, a famous eighteenth century boxer who invented boxing gloves. He also became a Yeoman of the Guard and a verger of the Abbey. The last burial in the Abbey was in 1906; since then, only ashes have been accepted. Ben Jonson, the poet, is buried upright. There is an admission charge to visit the Abbey unless you are attending a service there. with your back to Westminster Abbey, continue a short distance along Broad Sanctuary and cross the first traffic lights on your right. Cross the road at the pedestrian crossing on Tothill Street and continue along Storey's Gate, passing the Methodist Central Hall on your left and the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre on your right. Cross Matthew Parker Street and, soon after, Lewisham Street (passing the UK's European Commission offices on your left) and continue to the next road on your left, which is Old Queen Street. Turn left at Old Queen Street and walk to the end of it. At the end of Old Queen Street, turn left and then almost immediately turn right, down Queen Anne's Gate. As you walk along this road, admire the many buildings on either side, dating from the 1700's. The old headquarters of the Secret Service, where James Bond would have worked, used to be at no 21 and the buildings on either side of it. At the junction on Queen Anne's Gate, just after no. 34a, turn right to Birdcage Walk. Cross the road to enter St James's park and follow the path in front of you through the park until you come to a footbridge. Cross the footbridge and turn left, following another path, with the pond on your left. Near the end of this path, you will come to a concession stand at the junction with another path. Turn right at the concession stand and continue along this path a short distance to the road. At the road, turn left and walk towards Buckingham Palace, stopping in front of it.

The home of the Queen, Buckingham Palace was built in 1703. The present building is the third on the site. Around 300 people work there. Look at the flag pole on top of the Palace. When the Queen is in residence, the Royal Standard flag is raised. A soldier is responsible for taking it down the moment the Queen leaves. Though the Palace is generally not open to the public, during summer you can visit its State Apartments (admission charge) and see the Queen's large garden and collection of artwork. You can however see the Changing of the Guard for free at 11.30 am every morning during summer and every second morning during winter. (To get a less crowded view of the guards as they march past you, stand anywhere along the Mall between the Palace and Horseguards.) The large memorial in front of Buckingham Palace is called the Queen Victoria Memorial. Unveiled in 1911, the statue of the seated Victoria is 13 feet tall, yet was made from a single block of marble. Next to Buckingham Palace, on your left as you face the Memorial, is Green Park, made into a royal park by Charles II. It is likely to have been a burial site for lepers from the hospital of St James, which is supposedly why there are few flowers in the park. The park was a popular place for duels during the eighteenth century. Did You Know? Right beside Green Park tube station at the top of the park, there is a sunken area. This was once a reservoir in which Benjamin Franklin demonstrated to the Royal Navy the technique of pouring oil on troubled waters. The Navy went on to use this technique with great success on the Channel waters. The first cup of tea drunk in England was drunk in the Palace gardens in 1663. The balcony from which the Royal family waves to the crowds is actually at the back of the building with your back to Buckingham Palace, walk around the left hand side of the Queen Victoria Memorial, the large monument in front of you. Directly on the other side of the monument you will see a pink road leading down to Admiralty Arch, a set of arches crossing the road at the other end. This road is called The Mall. The reason it is pink is due to the material used to make the surface safer for the horses of the Household Cavalry, not to indicate that it leads to the palace. Walk along it a short distance until you reach Queen's Walk, a path running off to your left along the edge of the park, beside a building (Lancaster House). Follow Queen's Walk, where Charlie Chaplin made his first appearance on film (back in 1896 as a seven year old boy), until you see a small alleyway on your right. Turn right and follow this alleyway around to Cleveland Row. Walk along Cleveland Row and stop in front of St James' Palace on your right. This is where the London apartments of Princes Charles, William and Harry are.

Originally a crossroad of Piccadilly and Regent Street, the circus took on its present appearance in the late 1800's when Shaftesbury Avenue was connected to it. One of central London's busiest traffic junctions, it features the Statue of Eros (erected in 1893) in the centre and the enormous illuminated advertising signs overlooking it. The famous English chef, Marco Pierre White, has his restaurant inside the Criterion Hotel, which is behind Eros. Did You Know? The statue of Eros has pointed in three different directions since being erected, but never in the direction to which it was intended : facing Shaftesbury Avenue. In the first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet, Dr Watson and Stamford meet in the bar of the Criterion Hotel. Lilywhite's sports store, on the corner behind Eros, was established by James Lilywhite, who captained the English cricket team against Australia in 1876. walk past the Criterion Hotel and Theatre (behind Eros), then turn right at Haymarket. Walk along Haymarket, passing Burberrys on your left, and turn left at the end, along Cockspur Street. Walk along Cockspur Street, past the National Gallery Sainsbury wing, and stop in front of the National Gallery, the large white building on your left overlooking Trafalgar Square.

Trafalgar Square commemorates England's victory over France in 1805. In the centre of the square stands Nelson's Column, at 170 feet tall. Buildings surrounding the Square include South Africa House, Canada House, the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery (both FREE admission) and St Martin-in-the-Fields church. Pigeon-feeding is a popular pass-time for tourists to the Square even though it is no longer permitted. Even back in the eleventh century, the square was a traffic junction. And until 2000, the square had never been completed. While on the right hand side of it (in front of the National Gallery) there was a statue of George IV on horseback, until recently no statue had been placed on the corresponding plinth on the opposite corner. Did You Know? In front of Nelson's Column, on a traffic island at the top of Whitehall, which also marks the site of the old Charing Cross, stands a statue of Charles I on horseback. It was deliberately positioned here by his son, Charles II, to look down Whitehall to the spot where his father had been executed (in front of Banqueting House.) walk across Trafalgar Square, passing around the left hand side of Nelson's Column. Cross the first pedestrian lights, then turn right and cross again at the next lights, which lead to the island in the centre of the road. Pause next to the statue of Charles I on horseback. The road directly in front of you, in the direction the statue faces, is Whitehall. Walk along Whitehall, passing Banqueting House on your left, until you reach Horse Guards on your right. Stop at Horse Guards, then continue to the gates of Downing Street, a short distance further along Whitehall, on the right, and stop again.

The first main building on this walk along Whitehall is Banqueting House, on your left. It was built in 1622 and is the only remaining part of the Palace of Whitehall.

The Palace of Whitehall was originally built as York Place in 1245, and renamed as Whitehall by Henry VIII in 1529, when it was confiscated from Cardinal Wolsey. Charles I was beheaded on a stage in front of it in 1649.

The majority of buildings along Whitehall belong to Government departments. They include, on your left just after Banqueting House, the Ministry of Defence, which is the only Government office with its own chapel. On your right, just after Horse Guards, you will pass both the Foreign Office and Treasury.

Horse Guards, on your right just after Banqueting House, is Whitehall's biggest tourist attraction. The Life Guards (in red) and the Blues and Royals (in blue) have been here since Tudor times.

Through the courtyard you will see Horse Guards Parade. A great tournament was held here in 1540 by Henry VIII and knights from all over Europe attended. The Trooping of the Colour, where the Queen inspects her troops just as monarchs before her have done for hundreds of years, is held here every year on the Queen's official birthday, which is the 3rd Saturday in June (her real birthday is April 21).

Downing Street is named after Sir George Downing, the second graduate of Harvard College, who bought the land and built the houses in 1680.

Number 10 has been the official residence of the Prime Minister since 1732. There is no general public access to it.
Did You Know?
The Chancellor of the Exchequer traditionally lives next door, in number eleven.

However, when Labour came to power in 1997, the Prime Minister, Tony Blair, and the Chancellor, Gordon Brown (who became Prime Minister in 2007) swapped residences to enable the Blair family to have more room. This had never happened before.
you have now completed this walk ...... I hope you enjoyed it

Continue along Whitehall to Parliament Square and turn left. Walk along Bridge Street, back to your starting point outside Westminster tube station.
From this point, you could cross Westminster Bridge and turn left to begin the cultural walk from in front of the London Eye.

Watling Street is one of the oldest roads in London. It marks the path of the original Roman road from Dover to Kent and the border with Wales.
Bread Street was where (in Norman times) one of the few brothels in the city existed. There was also a prison here. Famous people born in this area incude John Milton and Governor Arthur Philip, the first governor of Australia.

St Paul's was founded in 604. However, the present building, the fifth on the site, dates from 1675. It is the second largest cathedral in the world, after St Peter's in Rome.
Construction did not start until 10 years after the Great Fire, which destroyed the previous structure. This earlier building, begun in 1087, took 200 years to build and was even bigger than the present building, which took 35 years to complete.

The cathedral is the most famous work from London's greatest architect, Sir Christopher Wren (who is buried in it.) However, the building is not exactly to the Royal-approved design. Wren submitted 3 different designs for it before his 4th version was eventually agreed. He then assembled large screens around the construction site to hide development, and proceeded to build the cathedral to a design different again from that which had been approved.
In 1981, the wedding of Charles and Diana took place here.

Other famous people who are buried in St Paul's include Lord Nelson and the Duke of Wellington, whose monument took 56 years to complete.
In front of the cathedral there are some wooden posts representing the last City toll gate, built in the thirteenth century. They mark the old route to Cheapside. The "gate" is now opened only during ceremonial occasions.
Did You Know?
Until 1911, St Paul's Churchyard was the centre of the London book trade, and had been so since before printing arrived in England in 1476.

All new books had to be registered at the nearby Stationer's Hall, the livery hall of the Stationer's and Newspaper Maker's Company, which controlled the printing and publishing trades.
St Pauls marks the halfway point on this walk and you can end it here at nearby St Pauls station. To do so, continue past the front of the cathedral and turn right, following the signs.

To continue the walk, go past the front of the cathedral then turn up Ava Maria Lane (which becomes Warwick Lane), passing through Paternoster Square, where the London Stock Exchange is located. At the end of Warwick Lane, turn left along Newgate Street, then right at the junction with Giltspur Street. (On your left at this junction is Old Bailey and the site of Newgate prison, on the corner.)

Bath is probably best known for two main attractions: its Roman Baths and its Georgian architecture.
However, it's not only a place for sightseeing. It's a great town to relax in for free : watching open air bands playing beside the River Avon, especially in spring and summer months, or browsing the shops that line the charming Pulteney Bridge.
Famous residents have included Jane Austen. The Romans built a bath house in Bath between the first and fifth centuries AD to enjoy the healing properties of Britain's only hot springs.
During Georgian times, two more baths were built. In the 1970's, the baths were closed, but have now been renovated. The baths are now a World Heritage Site and are open for visits. (

Its original purpose is unclear but some have speculated that it was a temple made for the worship of ancient earth deities. It has also been called an astronomical observatory for marking significant events on the prehistoric calendar.

Others claim that it was a sacred site for the burial of high-ranking citizens from the societies of long ago. Whatever its purpose when built, it makes a great day out to visit.

The stones you can see today represent Stonehenge in ruin. You can no longer walk among them.

Many of the original stones have fallen or been removed by previous generations for home construction or road repair. There has also been serious damage to some of the smaller bluestones resulting from close visitor contact (prohibited since 1978) and the prehistoric carvings on the larger sarsen stones show signs of significant wear.

Windsor Castle is an official residence of The Queen and the largest occupied castle in the world. A Royal home and fortress for over 900 years, the Castle remains a working palace today.
Visitors can walk around the State Apartments, extensive suites of rooms at the heart of the working palace. For part of the year visitors can also see the Semi State rooms, which are some of the most splendid interiors in the castle. They are furnished with treasures from the Royal Collection including paintings by Holbein, Rubens, Van Dyck and Lawrence, fine tapestries and porcelain, sculpture and armour.
Within the Castle complex there are many additional attractions, including the Drawings Gallery, Queen Mary's dolls' house, and the fourteenth-century St. George's Chapel, the burial place of ten sovereigns and setting for many Royal weddings.

Hampton Court Palace promises a magical journey back through 500 years of royal history. Discover the magnificent State Apartments of Henry VIII and William III and the priceless collection of Royal paintings. Explore 60 acres of immaculate riverside gardens and lose yourself in the world-famous maze. Package includes a daily programme of activities and a multilingual sound guide in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Japanese. There are also sound guides for the whole family to enjoy..

Произнося слово «Оксфорд», мы, прежде всего, подразумеваем знаменитый престижный университет. Однако не стоит забывать и о том, что Оксфорд является еще и маленьким уютным городком, расположенным в центре Англии, чуть ближе к югу. Оксфорд – это административный центр графства Оксфордшира. Здесь протекают реки Темза и Черуэлл. Население Оксфорда немногочисленно – примерно 120 тысяч человек. Довольно много здесь студентов, местных англичан и приезжих из-за рубежа – их количество примерно составляет 30 тысяч жителей.
О происхождении города до сих пор толкуют историки, основываясь на разных рукописях и хрониках. В англосаксонских хрониках первое упоминание об Оксфорде датируется примерно 912 годом, в то время, когда правил Эдуард I.
С 10 века нашей эры Европа постепенно начала программу образования. Университеты появлялись во Франции, Италии, Испании. Только в Англии «процветала» неграмотность. Тогда саксонский король Альфред Великий приказал создать университет. Вначале в нем учились только представители духовенства, но затем университет начал принимать студентов из других стран.

Оксфорд – уютный, ухоженный городок с красивыми парками, аккуратно подстриженными ярко-зелеными лужайками и пышными клумбами с цветами. Характерный архитектурный стиль для Оксфорда, как, впрочем, и для большей части Европы, - это готика. Тонкие шпили, устремленные ввысь, мозаика на окнах католических церквей, особая утонченность и изысканность – это самые характерные готические черты, которые олицетворяют стремление человека к Богу.
Поскольку Оксфорд – город с богатой историей, жители чтут его историю и уважают свой дом. Большинство зданий здесь остались практически неизменными со средневековых времен. Если вы совершите автобусную экскурсию, вы в наиболее полной мере сможете ощутить дух древности. Туристов здесь развозят специальные двухъярусные автобусы. Вы будете располагаться на верхнем ярусе под открытым небом. Такая прогулка станет для вас незабываемой.

Оксфорд, с красивыми величественными зданиями и приятной для глаз природой, станет прекрасным объектом для тех, кто любит фотографировать. Каждый уголок здесь заслуживает внимания. Здесь даже располагались съемочные площадки некоторых фильмов, в частности, и о Гарри Поттере. Возле одного их таких колледжей всегда толпится народ. Отстояв где-то час в очереди, вы сможете посмотреть на те места, где проводили свое время герои этого фильма. Колледжи города можно посетить только за деньги. Но если вам повезет, вас бесплатно проведет какой-нибудь приятель-студент такого ВУЗа.
В городе насчитывается много архитектурных памятников, на которые стоит взглянуть. Прежде всего, это, конечно, Оксфордский университет. Он является международным образовательным и исследовательским центром. В его состав включено 41 колледж. Самыми старыми является Баллиол и Мертон, самым крупным считается Кембл. В центре Оксфорда расположена Озерная школа, которая стоит совсем рядом с колледжем Ворсестер. Здесь также находится здание Бизнес-школы Оксфордского университета. Стоит только перечислить всех тех людей, которым посчастливилось здесь учиться и окончить колледжи, чтобы понять всю значимость образовательной системы здесь: Льюис Кэрролл, Оскар Уальд, Перси Шелли, Адам Смит, Джонатан Свифт, Маргарет Тэтчер, Индира Ганди.
Еще одной достопримечательностью является Башня Магдален – центральное строение колледжа Магдален, который был основан в 1458 году. Она также выполнена в готическом стиле, характерном для Великобритании. Здесь существует традиция: 1 мая каждый год хор колледжа устраивает торжественное песнопение. Евхаристический гимн 17 века в его исполнении прозвучит не позже шести часов утра, поэтому вам стоит встать пораньше, чтобы услышать эти прекрасные звуки. Башня Магдален и мост Магдален являются символом города.
Если вы будете в Оксфорде, стоит посетить и музей Эшмолин, который был основан в 1683 году по требованию королевской семьи. Он единственный был отрыт для свободного посещения. Здесь выставляли свои работы бедные художники, которые надеялись получить славу и известностью. В настоящее время в этом музее выставлены знаменитые произведения Рембрандта, Леонардо да Винчи, Микеланджело, Рафаэля и других маститых художников.
Оксфордский собор является всего лишь маленькой часовней, а точнее, самой маленькой в Англии. Она относилась к владениям «Церкви Христа». Однако именно здесь в 13 веке Святой Георгий был провозглашен покровителем Англии.
Неподалеку от церкви св. Девы Марии находится Радклиф Камера – круглое здание с куполом, которое являлось читальным залом знаменитой Бодлианской библиотеки. Эта библиотека, одна из крупнейших во всем мире, насчитывает около двух млн. томов.
Еще одно интересное место, куда стоит заглянуть – это Ботанический сад. Он был основан в 1621 году. Здесь находится огромная коллекция растений со всего мира. Здесь занимались изучением лекарственных растений.

Для кулинарных гурманов здесь также есть, чем удовлетворить душу и желудок. Внешний вид многих ресторанчиков внешне очень напоминает старинный стиль, и это не случайно. Англичане, подобно, коммунистам, в одно время начали активно перестраивать церкви в различные развлекательные учреждения и заведения общественного питания. Но сервис и меню от этого не проиграли. В пабах существует отличный выбор напитков, расширенное меню, включающее в себя изысканные морепродукты. Вообще в Оксфорде можно попробовать не только традиционную английскую кухню. Здесь представлены все виды кулинарного творчества Европы и даже немного больше. В ресторане Taste of India вы сможете отведать блюда, приготовленные по индийским рецептам, и, кстати, совсем недорого. А в ресторане du Liban вы познакомитесь с лучшими творениями турецкой и арабской кухни. Здесь удовлетворят запросы даже приверженца вегетарианства.

Чтобы насладиться культурной жизнью города, можно посетить Оксфордский театр. Здесь проходят новые мюзиклы и пьесы до их премьеры в Лондоне. Любителям кинематографа можно посоветовать сходить в кинотеатр «Феникс». А тем, кто предпочитает проводить время в ночных клубах, следует отправиться в клуб «Escape», выдержанный в марокканском стиле, или «The Bridge». Кстати, последний предпочитают поклонники R&B-течения, хип-хопа и соул-мьюзик. В клубе «Viva Salsa» можно принять участие в обучении танцам с лучшими приглашенными ди-джеями.

London Museums 

  • Обзорная экскурсия по Лондону/ London sightseeing
  • Стоунхендж /Stonehenge
  • Лондонский Тауер / Tower of London
  • Музей естествознания/ Natural History Museum
  • Музей науки/ Science Museum
  • Хемптон Корт/Hampton Court
  • Музей Лондона/ London Museum
  • Национальная галерея / National Gallery
  • Ковент Гаден/ Covent Garden
  • Музей Банка/ Bank Museum
  • Королевский ботанический сад /Kew Gardens
  • Колесо обозрения /London Eye
  • Музей Виктории и Альберта/ Victoria & Albert Museum
  • Британский Музей/ British Museum
  • Поездка в Оксфорд/ Oxford* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)
  • Поездка в Бат/ Bath* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)
  • Поездка в Стратфорд на Ейвоне/ Stratford on Avon* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)

The correct name for the Houses of Parliament is the Palace of Westminster, which was built in 1040 by Edward the Confessor and was the main Royal residence in London until Henry VIII moved to Whitehall. The present building dates from the 1800's and took 20 years to complete. It was built by Charles Barry, who is buried in Westminster Abbey. It is the largest Gothic building in the world - there are over 1,000 rooms and two miles of corridors in it. In the centre stands Westminster Hall, the only part of the original building that survives. Many great treason trials have taken place in Westminster. In 1305, Braveheart was sentenced to death here and in 1606 Guy Fawkes, the man who tried to blow up Parliament, met a similar fate. It is possible to visit the public gallery of the Houses of Parliament for free (although you will have to pass security checks and may have to queue a while). Did You Know? Though many people think Big Ben is the name of the tower with the famous clockface, it is actually the name of the bell within it. Big Ben is named after the Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall, who was in charge of construction of the clock. He was heavily criticised by politicians over the problems he had in building it. The bell's familiar ring is caused by a crack which appeared in 1859, within a few months of the bell being installed. The bell was re-cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry Company but soon cracked again. It has never been repaired. When the light above Big Ben is illuminated, Parliament is sitting. with your back to Big Ben, stop and face the square.

The correct name for the Houses of Parliament is the Palace of Westminster, which was built in 1040 by Edward the Confessor and was the main Royal residence in London until Henry VIII moved to Whitehall. The present building dates from the 1800's and took 20 years to complete. It was built by Charles Barry, who is buried in Westminster Abbey. It is the largest Gothic building in the world - there are over 1,000 rooms and two miles of corridors in it. In the centre stands Westminster Hall, the only part of the original building that survives. Many great treason trials have taken place in Westminster. In 1305, Braveheart was sentenced to death here and in 1606 Guy Fawkes, the man who tried to blow up Parliament, met a similar fate. It is possible to visit the public gallery of the Houses of Parliament for free (although you will have to pass security checks and may have to queue a while). Did You Know? Though many people think Big Ben is the name of the tower with the famous clockface, it is actually the name of the bell within it. Big Ben is named after the Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall, who was in charge of construction of the clock. He was heavily criticised by politicians over the problems he had in building it. The bell's familiar ring is caused by a crack which appeared in 1859, within a few months of the bell being installed. The bell was re-cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry Company but soon cracked again. It has never been repaired. When the light above Big Ben is illuminated, Parliament is sitting. with your back to Big Ben, stop and face the square.

The Abbey was built by Edward the Confessor, and William the Conqueror was crowned in it on Christmas Day 1066. Thousands of people are buried, or have their ashes interred, in it. Many others have plaques. Those buried in the Abbey include * Royalty - Henry III, Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, James I, Charles II * Politicians - Pitt the Younger, Pitt the Elder, Chamberlain, Gladstone * Poets and Writers - Chaucer, Jonson, Browning, Tennyson In 1997, the funeral service for Diana, Princess of Wales was held there. (Though she is not buried in the Abbey.) Did You Know? One person buried in the Abbey has three separate monuments. He was John Broughton, a famous eighteenth century boxer who invented boxing gloves. He also became a Yeoman of the Guard and a verger of the Abbey. The last burial in the Abbey was in 1906; since then, only ashes have been accepted. Ben Jonson, the poet, is buried upright. There is an admission charge to visit the Abbey unless you are attending a service there. with your back to Westminster Abbey, continue a short distance along Broad Sanctuary and cross the first traffic lights on your right. Cross the road at the pedestrian crossing on Tothill Street and continue along Storey's Gate, passing the Methodist Central Hall on your left and the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre on your right. Cross Matthew Parker Street and, soon after, Lewisham Street (passing the UK's European Commission offices on your left) and continue to the next road on your left, which is Old Queen Street. Turn left at Old Queen Street and walk to the end of it. At the end of Old Queen Street, turn left and then almost immediately turn right, down Queen Anne's Gate. As you walk along this road, admire the many buildings on either side, dating from the 1700's. The old headquarters of the Secret Service, where James Bond would have worked, used to be at no 21 and the buildings on either side of it. At the junction on Queen Anne's Gate, just after no. 34a, turn right to Birdcage Walk. Cross the road to enter St James's park and follow the path in front of you through the park until you come to a footbridge. Cross the footbridge and turn left, following another path, with the pond on your left. Near the end of this path, you will come to a concession stand at the junction with another path. Turn right at the concession stand and continue along this path a short distance to the road. At the road, turn left and walk towards Buckingham Palace, stopping in front of it.

The home of the Queen, Buckingham Palace was built in 1703. The present building is the third on the site. Around 300 people work there. Look at the flag pole on top of the Palace. When the Queen is in residence, the Royal Standard flag is raised. A soldier is responsible for taking it down the moment the Queen leaves. Though the Palace is generally not open to the public, during summer you can visit its State Apartments (admission charge) and see the Queen's large garden and collection of artwork. You can however see the Changing of the Guard for free at 11.30 am every morning during summer and every second morning during winter. (To get a less crowded view of the guards as they march past you, stand anywhere along the Mall between the Palace and Horseguards.) The large memorial in front of Buckingham Palace is called the Queen Victoria Memorial. Unveiled in 1911, the statue of the seated Victoria is 13 feet tall, yet was made from a single block of marble. Next to Buckingham Palace, on your left as you face the Memorial, is Green Park, made into a royal park by Charles II. It is likely to have been a burial site for lepers from the hospital of St James, which is supposedly why there are few flowers in the park. The park was a popular place for duels during the eighteenth century. Did You Know? Right beside Green Park tube station at the top of the park, there is a sunken area. This was once a reservoir in which Benjamin Franklin demonstrated to the Royal Navy the technique of pouring oil on troubled waters. The Navy went on to use this technique with great success on the Channel waters. The first cup of tea drunk in England was drunk in the Palace gardens in 1663. The balcony from which the Royal family waves to the crowds is actually at the back of the building with your back to Buckingham Palace, walk around the left hand side of the Queen Victoria Memorial, the large monument in front of you. Directly on the other side of the monument you will see a pink road leading down to Admiralty Arch, a set of arches crossing the road at the other end. This road is called The Mall. The reason it is pink is due to the material used to make the surface safer for the horses of the Household Cavalry, not to indicate that it leads to the palace. Walk along it a short distance until you reach Queen's Walk, a path running off to your left along the edge of the park, beside a building (Lancaster House). Follow Queen's Walk, where Charlie Chaplin made his first appearance on film (back in 1896 as a seven year old boy), until you see a small alleyway on your right. Turn right and follow this alleyway around to Cleveland Row. Walk along Cleveland Row and stop in front of St James' Palace on your right. This is where the London apartments of Princes Charles, William and Harry are.

Originally a crossroad of Piccadilly and Regent Street, the circus took on its present appearance in the late 1800's when Shaftesbury Avenue was connected to it. One of central London's busiest traffic junctions, it features the Statue of Eros (erected in 1893) in the centre and the enormous illuminated advertising signs overlooking it. The famous English chef, Marco Pierre White, has his restaurant inside the Criterion Hotel, which is behind Eros. Did You Know? The statue of Eros has pointed in three different directions since being erected, but never in the direction to which it was intended : facing Shaftesbury Avenue. In the first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet, Dr Watson and Stamford meet in the bar of the Criterion Hotel. Lilywhite's sports store, on the corner behind Eros, was established by James Lilywhite, who captained the English cricket team against Australia in 1876. walk past the Criterion Hotel and Theatre (behind Eros), then turn right at Haymarket. Walk along Haymarket, passing Burberrys on your left, and turn left at the end, along Cockspur Street. Walk along Cockspur Street, past the National Gallery Sainsbury wing, and stop in front of the National Gallery, the large white building on your left overlooking Trafalgar Square.

Trafalgar Square commemorates England's victory over France in 1805. In the centre of the square stands Nelson's Column, at 170 feet tall. Buildings surrounding the Square include South Africa House, Canada House, the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery (both FREE admission) and St Martin-in-the-Fields church. Pigeon-feeding is a popular pass-time for tourists to the Square even though it is no longer permitted. Even back in the eleventh century, the square was a traffic junction. And until 2000, the square had never been completed. While on the right hand side of it (in front of the National Gallery) there was a statue of George IV on horseback, until recently no statue had been placed on the corresponding plinth on the opposite corner. Did You Know? In front of Nelson's Column, on a traffic island at the top of Whitehall, which also marks the site of the old Charing Cross, stands a statue of Charles I on horseback. It was deliberately positioned here by his son, Charles II, to look down Whitehall to the spot where his father had been executed (in front of Banqueting House.) walk across Trafalgar Square, passing around the left hand side of Nelson's Column. Cross the first pedestrian lights, then turn right and cross again at the next lights, which lead to the island in the centre of the road. Pause next to the statue of Charles I on horseback. The road directly in front of you, in the direction the statue faces, is Whitehall. Walk along Whitehall, passing Banqueting House on your left, until you reach Horse Guards on your right. Stop at Horse Guards, then continue to the gates of Downing Street, a short distance further along Whitehall, on the right, and stop again.

The first main building on this walk along Whitehall is Banqueting House, on your left. It was built in 1622 and is the only remaining part of the Palace of Whitehall.

The Palace of Whitehall was originally built as York Place in 1245, and renamed as Whitehall by Henry VIII in 1529, when it was confiscated from Cardinal Wolsey. Charles I was beheaded on a stage in front of it in 1649.

The majority of buildings along Whitehall belong to Government departments. They include, on your left just after Banqueting House, the Ministry of Defence, which is the only Government office with its own chapel. On your right, just after Horse Guards, you will pass both the Foreign Office and Treasury.

Horse Guards, on your right just after Banqueting House, is Whitehall's biggest tourist attraction. The Life Guards (in red) and the Blues and Royals (in blue) have been here since Tudor times.

Through the courtyard you will see Horse Guards Parade. A great tournament was held here in 1540 by Henry VIII and knights from all over Europe attended. The Trooping of the Colour, where the Queen inspects her troops just as monarchs before her have done for hundreds of years, is held here every year on the Queen's official birthday, which is the 3rd Saturday in June (her real birthday is April 21).

Downing Street is named after Sir George Downing, the second graduate of Harvard College, who bought the land and built the houses in 1680.

Number 10 has been the official residence of the Prime Minister since 1732. There is no general public access to it.
Did You Know?
The Chancellor of the Exchequer traditionally lives next door, in number eleven.

However, when Labour came to power in 1997, the Prime Minister, Tony Blair, and the Chancellor, Gordon Brown (who became Prime Minister in 2007) swapped residences to enable the Blair family to have more room. This had never happened before.
you have now completed this walk ...... I hope you enjoyed it

Continue along Whitehall to Parliament Square and turn left. Walk along Bridge Street, back to your starting point outside Westminster tube station.
From this point, you could cross Westminster Bridge and turn left to begin the cultural walk from in front of the London Eye.

Watling Street is one of the oldest roads in London. It marks the path of the original Roman road from Dover to Kent and the border with Wales.
Bread Street was where (in Norman times) one of the few brothels in the city existed. There was also a prison here. Famous people born in this area incude John Milton and Governor Arthur Philip, the first governor of Australia.

St Paul's was founded in 604. However, the present building, the fifth on the site, dates from 1675. It is the second largest cathedral in the world, after St Peter's in Rome.
Construction did not start until 10 years after the Great Fire, which destroyed the previous structure. This earlier building, begun in 1087, took 200 years to build and was even bigger than the present building, which took 35 years to complete.

The cathedral is the most famous work from London's greatest architect, Sir Christopher Wren (who is buried in it.) However, the building is not exactly to the Royal-approved design. Wren submitted 3 different designs for it before his 4th version was eventually agreed. He then assembled large screens around the construction site to hide development, and proceeded to build the cathedral to a design different again from that which had been approved.
In 1981, the wedding of Charles and Diana took place here.

Other famous people who are buried in St Paul's include Lord Nelson and the Duke of Wellington, whose monument took 56 years to complete.
In front of the cathedral there are some wooden posts representing the last City toll gate, built in the thirteenth century. They mark the old route to Cheapside. The "gate" is now opened only during ceremonial occasions.
Did You Know?
Until 1911, St Paul's Churchyard was the centre of the London book trade, and had been so since before printing arrived in England in 1476.

All new books had to be registered at the nearby Stationer's Hall, the livery hall of the Stationer's and Newspaper Maker's Company, which controlled the printing and publishing trades.
St Pauls marks the halfway point on this walk and you can end it here at nearby St Pauls station. To do so, continue past the front of the cathedral and turn right, following the signs.

To continue the walk, go past the front of the cathedral then turn up Ava Maria Lane (which becomes Warwick Lane), passing through Paternoster Square, where the London Stock Exchange is located. At the end of Warwick Lane, turn left along Newgate Street, then right at the junction with Giltspur Street. (On your left at this junction is Old Bailey and the site of Newgate prison, on the corner.)

Bath is probably best known for two main attractions: its Roman Baths and its Georgian architecture.
However, it's not only a place for sightseeing. It's a great town to relax in for free : watching open air bands playing beside the River Avon, especially in spring and summer months, or browsing the shops that line the charming Pulteney Bridge.
Famous residents have included Jane Austen. The Romans built a bath house in Bath between the first and fifth centuries AD to enjoy the healing properties of Britain's only hot springs.
During Georgian times, two more baths were built. In the 1970's, the baths were closed, but have now been renovated. The baths are now a World Heritage Site and are open for visits. (

Its original purpose is unclear but some have speculated that it was a temple made for the worship of ancient earth deities. It has also been called an astronomical observatory for marking significant events on the prehistoric calendar.

Others claim that it was a sacred site for the burial of high-ranking citizens from the societies of long ago. Whatever its purpose when built, it makes a great day out to visit.

The stones you can see today represent Stonehenge in ruin. You can no longer walk among them.

Many of the original stones have fallen or been removed by previous generations for home construction or road repair. There has also been serious damage to some of the smaller bluestones resulting from close visitor contact (prohibited since 1978) and the prehistoric carvings on the larger sarsen stones show signs of significant wear.

Windsor Castle is an official residence of The Queen and the largest occupied castle in the world. A Royal home and fortress for over 900 years, the Castle remains a working palace today.
Visitors can walk around the State Apartments, extensive suites of rooms at the heart of the working palace. For part of the year visitors can also see the Semi State rooms, which are some of the most splendid interiors in the castle. They are furnished with treasures from the Royal Collection including paintings by Holbein, Rubens, Van Dyck and Lawrence, fine tapestries and porcelain, sculpture and armour.
Within the Castle complex there are many additional attractions, including the Drawings Gallery, Queen Mary's dolls' house, and the fourteenth-century St. George's Chapel, the burial place of ten sovereigns and setting for many Royal weddings.

Hampton Court Palace promises a magical journey back through 500 years of royal history. Discover the magnificent State Apartments of Henry VIII and William III and the priceless collection of Royal paintings. Explore 60 acres of immaculate riverside gardens and lose yourself in the world-famous maze. Package includes a daily programme of activities and a multilingual sound guide in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Japanese. There are also sound guides for the whole family to enjoy..

Произнося слово «Оксфорд», мы, прежде всего, подразумеваем знаменитый престижный университет. Однако не стоит забывать и о том, что Оксфорд является еще и маленьким уютным городком, расположенным в центре Англии, чуть ближе к югу. Оксфорд – это административный центр графства Оксфордшира. Здесь протекают реки Темза и Черуэлл. Население Оксфорда немногочисленно – примерно 120 тысяч человек. Довольно много здесь студентов, местных англичан и приезжих из-за рубежа – их количество примерно составляет 30 тысяч жителей.
О происхождении города до сих пор толкуют историки, основываясь на разных рукописях и хрониках. В англосаксонских хрониках первое упоминание об Оксфорде датируется примерно 912 годом, в то время, когда правил Эдуард I.
С 10 века нашей эры Европа постепенно начала программу образования. Университеты появлялись во Франции, Италии, Испании. Только в Англии «процветала» неграмотность. Тогда саксонский король Альфред Великий приказал создать университет. Вначале в нем учились только представители духовенства, но затем университет начал принимать студентов из других стран.

Оксфорд – уютный, ухоженный городок с красивыми парками, аккуратно подстриженными ярко-зелеными лужайками и пышными клумбами с цветами. Характерный архитектурный стиль для Оксфорда, как, впрочем, и для большей части Европы, - это готика. Тонкие шпили, устремленные ввысь, мозаика на окнах католических церквей, особая утонченность и изысканность – это самые характерные готические черты, которые олицетворяют стремление человека к Богу.
Поскольку Оксфорд – город с богатой историей, жители чтут его историю и уважают свой дом. Большинство зданий здесь остались практически неизменными со средневековых времен. Если вы совершите автобусную экскурсию, вы в наиболее полной мере сможете ощутить дух древности. Туристов здесь развозят специальные двухъярусные автобусы. Вы будете располагаться на верхнем ярусе под открытым небом. Такая прогулка станет для вас незабываемой.

Оксфорд, с красивыми величественными зданиями и приятной для глаз природой, станет прекрасным объектом для тех, кто любит фотографировать. Каждый уголок здесь заслуживает внимания. Здесь даже располагались съемочные площадки некоторых фильмов, в частности, и о Гарри Поттере. Возле одного их таких колледжей всегда толпится народ. Отстояв где-то час в очереди, вы сможете посмотреть на те места, где проводили свое время герои этого фильма. Колледжи города можно посетить только за деньги. Но если вам повезет, вас бесплатно проведет какой-нибудь приятель-студент такого ВУЗа.
В городе насчитывается много архитектурных памятников, на которые стоит взглянуть. Прежде всего, это, конечно, Оксфордский университет. Он является международным образовательным и исследовательским центром. В его состав включено 41 колледж. Самыми старыми является Баллиол и Мертон, самым крупным считается Кембл. В центре Оксфорда расположена Озерная школа, которая стоит совсем рядом с колледжем Ворсестер. Здесь также находится здание Бизнес-школы Оксфордского университета. Стоит только перечислить всех тех людей, которым посчастливилось здесь учиться и окончить колледжи, чтобы понять всю значимость образовательной системы здесь: Льюис Кэрролл, Оскар Уальд, Перси Шелли, Адам Смит, Джонатан Свифт, Маргарет Тэтчер, Индира Ганди.
Еще одной достопримечательностью является Башня Магдален – центральное строение колледжа Магдален, который был основан в 1458 году. Она также выполнена в готическом стиле, характерном для Великобритании. Здесь существует традиция: 1 мая каждый год хор колледжа устраивает торжественное песнопение. Евхаристический гимн 17 века в его исполнении прозвучит не позже шести часов утра, поэтому вам стоит встать пораньше, чтобы услышать эти прекрасные звуки. Башня Магдален и мост Магдален являются символом города.
Если вы будете в Оксфорде, стоит посетить и музей Эшмолин, который был основан в 1683 году по требованию королевской семьи. Он единственный был отрыт для свободного посещения. Здесь выставляли свои работы бедные художники, которые надеялись получить славу и известностью. В настоящее время в этом музее выставлены знаменитые произведения Рембрандта, Леонардо да Винчи, Микеланджело, Рафаэля и других маститых художников.
Оксфордский собор является всего лишь маленькой часовней, а точнее, самой маленькой в Англии. Она относилась к владениям «Церкви Христа». Однако именно здесь в 13 веке Святой Георгий был провозглашен покровителем Англии.
Неподалеку от церкви св. Девы Марии находится Радклиф Камера – круглое здание с куполом, которое являлось читальным залом знаменитой Бодлианской библиотеки. Эта библиотека, одна из крупнейших во всем мире, насчитывает около двух млн. томов.
Еще одно интересное место, куда стоит заглянуть – это Ботанический сад. Он был основан в 1621 году. Здесь находится огромная коллекция растений со всего мира. Здесь занимались изучением лекарственных растений.

Для кулинарных гурманов здесь также есть, чем удовлетворить душу и желудок. Внешний вид многих ресторанчиков внешне очень напоминает старинный стиль, и это не случайно. Англичане, подобно, коммунистам, в одно время начали активно перестраивать церкви в различные развлекательные учреждения и заведения общественного питания. Но сервис и меню от этого не проиграли. В пабах существует отличный выбор напитков, расширенное меню, включающее в себя изысканные морепродукты. Вообще в Оксфорде можно попробовать не только традиционную английскую кухню. Здесь представлены все виды кулинарного творчества Европы и даже немного больше. В ресторане Taste of India вы сможете отведать блюда, приготовленные по индийским рецептам, и, кстати, совсем недорого. А в ресторане du Liban вы познакомитесь с лучшими творениями турецкой и арабской кухни. Здесь удовлетворят запросы даже приверженца вегетарианства.

Чтобы насладиться культурной жизнью города, можно посетить Оксфордский театр. Здесь проходят новые мюзиклы и пьесы до их премьеры в Лондоне. Любителям кинематографа можно посоветовать сходить в кинотеатр «Феникс». А тем, кто предпочитает проводить время в ночных клубах, следует отправиться в клуб «Escape», выдержанный в марокканском стиле, или «The Bridge». Кстати, последний предпочитают поклонники R&B-течения, хип-хопа и соул-мьюзик. В клубе «Viva Salsa» можно принять участие в обучении танцам с лучшими приглашенными ди-джеями.

Tours in England 

  • Обзорная экскурсия по Лондону/ London sightseeing
  • Стоунхендж /Stonehenge
  • Лондонский Тауер / Tower of London
  • Музей естествознания/ Natural History Museum
  • Музей науки/ Science Museum
  • Хемптон Корт/Hampton Court
  • Музей Лондона/ London Museum
  • Национальная галерея / National Gallery
  • Ковент Гаден/ Covent Garden
  • Музей Банка/ Bank Museum
  • Королевский ботанический сад /Kew Gardens
  • Колесо обозрения /London Eye
  • Музей Виктории и Альберта/ Victoria & Albert Museum
  • Британский Музей/ British Museum
  • Поездка в Оксфорд/ Oxford* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)
  • Поездка в Бат/ Bath* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)
  • Поездка в Стратфорд на Ейвоне/ Stratford on Avon* (экскурсионный автобус не включен в стоимость)

The correct name for the Houses of Parliament is the Palace of Westminster, which was built in 1040 by Edward the Confessor and was the main Royal residence in London until Henry VIII moved to Whitehall. The present building dates from the 1800's and took 20 years to complete. It was built by Charles Barry, who is buried in Westminster Abbey. It is the largest Gothic building in the world - there are over 1,000 rooms and two miles of corridors in it. In the centre stands Westminster Hall, the only part of the original building that survives. Many great treason trials have taken place in Westminster. In 1305, Braveheart was sentenced to death here and in 1606 Guy Fawkes, the man who tried to blow up Parliament, met a similar fate. It is possible to visit the public gallery of the Houses of Parliament for free (although you will have to pass security checks and may have to queue a while). Did You Know? Though many people think Big Ben is the name of the tower with the famous clockface, it is actually the name of the bell within it. Big Ben is named after the Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall, who was in charge of construction of the clock. He was heavily criticised by politicians over the problems he had in building it. The bell's familiar ring is caused by a crack which appeared in 1859, within a few months of the bell being installed. The bell was re-cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry Company but soon cracked again. It has never been repaired. When the light above Big Ben is illuminated, Parliament is sitting. with your back to Big Ben, stop and face the square.

The correct name for the Houses of Parliament is the Palace of Westminster, which was built in 1040 by Edward the Confessor and was the main Royal residence in London until Henry VIII moved to Whitehall. The present building dates from the 1800's and took 20 years to complete. It was built by Charles Barry, who is buried in Westminster Abbey. It is the largest Gothic building in the world - there are over 1,000 rooms and two miles of corridors in it. In the centre stands Westminster Hall, the only part of the original building that survives. Many great treason trials have taken place in Westminster. In 1305, Braveheart was sentenced to death here and in 1606 Guy Fawkes, the man who tried to blow up Parliament, met a similar fate. It is possible to visit the public gallery of the Houses of Parliament for free (although you will have to pass security checks and may have to queue a while). Did You Know? Though many people think Big Ben is the name of the tower with the famous clockface, it is actually the name of the bell within it. Big Ben is named after the Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall, who was in charge of construction of the clock. He was heavily criticised by politicians over the problems he had in building it. The bell's familiar ring is caused by a crack which appeared in 1859, within a few months of the bell being installed. The bell was re-cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry Company but soon cracked again. It has never been repaired. When the light above Big Ben is illuminated, Parliament is sitting. with your back to Big Ben, stop and face the square.

The Abbey was built by Edward the Confessor, and William the Conqueror was crowned in it on Christmas Day 1066. Thousands of people are buried, or have their ashes interred, in it. Many others have plaques. Those buried in the Abbey include * Royalty - Henry III, Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, James I, Charles II * Politicians - Pitt the Younger, Pitt the Elder, Chamberlain, Gladstone * Poets and Writers - Chaucer, Jonson, Browning, Tennyson In 1997, the funeral service for Diana, Princess of Wales was held there. (Though she is not buried in the Abbey.) Did You Know? One person buried in the Abbey has three separate monuments. He was John Broughton, a famous eighteenth century boxer who invented boxing gloves. He also became a Yeoman of the Guard and a verger of the Abbey. The last burial in the Abbey was in 1906; since then, only ashes have been accepted. Ben Jonson, the poet, is buried upright. There is an admission charge to visit the Abbey unless you are attending a service there. with your back to Westminster Abbey, continue a short distance along Broad Sanctuary and cross the first traffic lights on your right. Cross the road at the pedestrian crossing on Tothill Street and continue along Storey's Gate, passing the Methodist Central Hall on your left and the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre on your right. Cross Matthew Parker Street and, soon after, Lewisham Street (passing the UK's European Commission offices on your left) and continue to the next road on your left, which is Old Queen Street. Turn left at Old Queen Street and walk to the end of it. At the end of Old Queen Street, turn left and then almost immediately turn right, down Queen Anne's Gate. As you walk along this road, admire the many buildings on either side, dating from the 1700's. The old headquarters of the Secret Service, where James Bond would have worked, used to be at no 21 and the buildings on either side of it. At the junction on Queen Anne's Gate, just after no. 34a, turn right to Birdcage Walk. Cross the road to enter St James's park and follow the path in front of you through the park until you come to a footbridge. Cross the footbridge and turn left, following another path, with the pond on your left. Near the end of this path, you will come to a concession stand at the junction with another path. Turn right at the concession stand and continue along this path a short distance to the road. At the road, turn left and walk towards Buckingham Palace, stopping in front of it.

The home of the Queen, Buckingham Palace was built in 1703. The present building is the third on the site. Around 300 people work there. Look at the flag pole on top of the Palace. When the Queen is in residence, the Royal Standard flag is raised. A soldier is responsible for taking it down the moment the Queen leaves. Though the Palace is generally not open to the public, during summer you can visit its State Apartments (admission charge) and see the Queen's large garden and collection of artwork. You can however see the Changing of the Guard for free at 11.30 am every morning during summer and every second morning during winter. (To get a less crowded view of the guards as they march past you, stand anywhere along the Mall between the Palace and Horseguards.) The large memorial in front of Buckingham Palace is called the Queen Victoria Memorial. Unveiled in 1911, the statue of the seated Victoria is 13 feet tall, yet was made from a single block of marble. Next to Buckingham Palace, on your left as you face the Memorial, is Green Park, made into a royal park by Charles II. It is likely to have been a burial site for lepers from the hospital of St James, which is supposedly why there are few flowers in the park. The park was a popular place for duels during the eighteenth century. Did You Know? Right beside Green Park tube station at the top of the park, there is a sunken area. This was once a reservoir in which Benjamin Franklin demonstrated to the Royal Navy the technique of pouring oil on troubled waters. The Navy went on to use this technique with great success on the Channel waters. The first cup of tea drunk in England was drunk in the Palace gardens in 1663. The balcony from which the Royal family waves to the crowds is actually at the back of the building with your back to Buckingham Palace, walk around the left hand side of the Queen Victoria Memorial, the large monument in front of you. Directly on the other side of the monument you will see a pink road leading down to Admiralty Arch, a set of arches crossing the road at the other end. This road is called The Mall. The reason it is pink is due to the material used to make the surface safer for the horses of the Household Cavalry, not to indicate that it leads to the palace. Walk along it a short distance until you reach Queen's Walk, a path running off to your left along the edge of the park, beside a building (Lancaster House). Follow Queen's Walk, where Charlie Chaplin made his first appearance on film (back in 1896 as a seven year old boy), until you see a small alleyway on your right. Turn right and follow this alleyway around to Cleveland Row. Walk along Cleveland Row and stop in front of St James' Palace on your right. This is where the London apartments of Princes Charles, William and Harry are.

Originally a crossroad of Piccadilly and Regent Street, the circus took on its present appearance in the late 1800's when Shaftesbury Avenue was connected to it. One of central London's busiest traffic junctions, it features the Statue of Eros (erected in 1893) in the centre and the enormous illuminated advertising signs overlooking it. The famous English chef, Marco Pierre White, has his restaurant inside the Criterion Hotel, which is behind Eros. Did You Know? The statue of Eros has pointed in three different directions since being erected, but never in the direction to which it was intended : facing Shaftesbury Avenue. In the first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet, Dr Watson and Stamford meet in the bar of the Criterion Hotel. Lilywhite's sports store, on the corner behind Eros, was established by James Lilywhite, who captained the English cricket team against Australia in 1876. walk past the Criterion Hotel and Theatre (behind Eros), then turn right at Haymarket. Walk along Haymarket, passing Burberrys on your left, and turn left at the end, along Cockspur Street. Walk along Cockspur Street, past the National Gallery Sainsbury wing, and stop in front of the National Gallery, the large white building on your left overlooking Trafalgar Square.

Trafalgar Square commemorates England's victory over France in 1805. In the centre of the square stands Nelson's Column, at 170 feet tall. Buildings surrounding the Square include South Africa House, Canada House, the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery (both FREE admission) and St Martin-in-the-Fields church. Pigeon-feeding is a popular pass-time for tourists to the Square even though it is no longer permitted. Even back in the eleventh century, the square was a traffic junction. And until 2000, the square had never been completed. While on the right hand side of it (in front of the National Gallery) there was a statue of George IV on horseback, until recently no statue had been placed on the corresponding plinth on the opposite corner. Did You Know? In front of Nelson's Column, on a traffic island at the top of Whitehall, which also marks the site of the old Charing Cross, stands a statue of Charles I on horseback. It was deliberately positioned here by his son, Charles II, to look down Whitehall to the spot where his father had been executed (in front of Banqueting House.) walk across Trafalgar Square, passing around the left hand side of Nelson's Column. Cross the first pedestrian lights, then turn right and cross again at the next lights, which lead to the island in the centre of the road. Pause next to the statue of Charles I on horseback. The road directly in front of you, in the direction the statue faces, is Whitehall. Walk along Whitehall, passing Banqueting House on your left, until you reach Horse Guards on your right. Stop at Horse Guards, then continue to the gates of Downing Street, a short distance further along Whitehall, on the right, and stop again.

The first main building on this walk along Whitehall is Banqueting House, on your left. It was built in 1622 and is the only remaining part of the Palace of Whitehall.

The Palace of Whitehall was originally built as York Place in 1245, and renamed as Whitehall by Henry VIII in 1529, when it was confiscated from Cardinal Wolsey. Charles I was beheaded on a stage in front of it in 1649.

The majority of buildings along Whitehall belong to Government departments. They include, on your left just after Banqueting House, the Ministry of Defence, which is the only Government office with its own chapel. On your right, just after Horse Guards, you will pass both the Foreign Office and Treasury.

Horse Guards, on your right just after Banqueting House, is Whitehall's biggest tourist attraction. The Life Guards (in red) and the Blues and Royals (in blue) have been here since Tudor times.

Through the courtyard you will see Horse Guards Parade. A great tournament was held here in 1540 by Henry VIII and knights from all over Europe attended. The Trooping of the Colour, where the Queen inspects her troops just as monarchs before her have done for hundreds of years, is held here every year on the Queen's official birthday, which is the 3rd Saturday in June (her real birthday is April 21).

Downing Street is named after Sir George Downing, the second graduate of Harvard College, who bought the land and built the houses in 1680.

Number 10 has been the official residence of the Prime Minister since 1732. There is no general public access to it.
Did You Know?
The Chancellor of the Exchequer traditionally lives next door, in number eleven.

However, when Labour came to power in 1997, the Prime Minister, Tony Blair, and the Chancellor, Gordon Brown (who became Prime Minister in 2007) swapped residences to enable the Blair family to have more room. This had never happened before.
you have now completed this walk ...... I hope you enjoyed it

Continue along Whitehall to Parliament Square and turn left. Walk along Bridge Street, back to your starting point outside Westminster tube station.
From this point, you could cross Westminster Bridge and turn left to begin the cultural walk from in front of the London Eye.

Watling Street is one of the oldest roads in London. It marks the path of the original Roman road from Dover to Kent and the border with Wales.
Bread Street was where (in Norman times) one of the few brothels in the city existed. There was also a prison here. Famous people born in this area incude John Milton and Governor Arthur Philip, the first governor of Australia.

St Paul's was founded in 604. However, the present building, the fifth on the site, dates from 1675. It is the second largest cathedral in the world, after St Peter's in Rome.
Construction did not start until 10 years after the Great Fire, which destroyed the previous structure. This earlier building, begun in 1087, took 200 years to build and was even bigger than the present building, which took 35 years to complete.

The cathedral is the most famous work from London's greatest architect, Sir Christopher Wren (who is buried in it.) However, the building is not exactly to the Royal-approved design. Wren submitted 3 different designs for it before his 4th version was eventually agreed. He then assembled large screens around the construction site to hide development, and proceeded to build the cathedral to a design different again from that which had been approved.
In 1981, the wedding of Charles and Diana took place here.

Other famous people who are buried in St Paul's include Lord Nelson and the Duke of Wellington, whose monument took 56 years to complete.
In front of the cathedral there are some wooden posts representing the last City toll gate, built in the thirteenth century. They mark the old route to Cheapside. The "gate" is now opened only during ceremonial occasions.
Did You Know?
Until 1911, St Paul's Churchyard was the centre of the London book trade, and had been so since before printing arrived in England in 1476.

All new books had to be registered at the nearby Stationer's Hall, the livery hall of the Stationer's and Newspaper Maker's Company, which controlled the printing and publishing trades.
St Pauls marks the halfway point on this walk and you can end it here at nearby St Pauls station. To do so, continue past the front of the cathedral and turn right, following the signs.

To continue the walk, go past the front of the cathedral then turn up Ava Maria Lane (which becomes Warwick Lane), passing through Paternoster Square, where the London Stock Exchange is located. At the end of Warwick Lane, turn left along Newgate Street, then right at the junction with Giltspur Street. (On your left at this junction is Old Bailey and the site of Newgate prison, on the corner.)

Bath is probably best known for two main attractions: its Roman Baths and its Georgian architecture.
However, it's not only a place for sightseeing. It's a great town to relax in for free : watching open air bands playing beside the River Avon, especially in spring and summer months, or browsing the shops that line the charming Pulteney Bridge.
Famous residents have included Jane Austen. The Romans built a bath house in Bath between the first and fifth centuries AD to enjoy the healing properties of Britain's only hot springs.
During Georgian times, two more baths were built. In the 1970's, the baths were closed, but have now been renovated. The baths are now a World Heritage Site and are open for visits. (

Its original purpose is unclear but some have speculated that it was a temple made for the worship of ancient earth deities. It has also been called an astronomical observatory for marking significant events on the prehistoric calendar.

Others claim that it was a sacred site for the burial of high-ranking citizens from the societies of long ago. Whatever its purpose when built, it makes a great day out to visit.

The stones you can see today represent Stonehenge in ruin. You can no longer walk among them.

Many of the original stones have fallen or been removed by previous generations for home construction or road repair. There has also been serious damage to some of the smaller bluestones resulting from close visitor contact (prohibited since 1978) and the prehistoric carvings on the larger sarsen stones show signs of significant wear.

Windsor Castle is an official residence of The Queen and the largest occupied castle in the world. A Royal home and fortress for over 900 years, the Castle remains a working palace today.
Visitors can walk around the State Apartments, extensive suites of rooms at the heart of the working palace. For part of the year visitors can also see the Semi State rooms, which are some of the most splendid interiors in the castle. They are furnished with treasures from the Royal Collection including paintings by Holbein, Rubens, Van Dyck and Lawrence, fine tapestries and porcelain, sculpture and armour.
Within the Castle complex there are many additional attractions, including the Drawings Gallery, Queen Mary's dolls' house, and the fourteenth-century St. George's Chapel, the burial place of ten sovereigns and setting for many Royal weddings.

Hampton Court Palace promises a magical journey back through 500 years of royal history. Discover the magnificent State Apartments of Henry VIII and William III and the priceless collection of Royal paintings. Explore 60 acres of immaculate riverside gardens and lose yourself in the world-famous maze. Package includes a daily programme of activities and a multilingual sound guide in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Japanese. There are also sound guides for the whole family to enjoy..

Произнося слово «Оксфорд», мы, прежде всего, подразумеваем знаменитый престижный университет. Однако не стоит забывать и о том, что Оксфорд является еще и маленьким уютным городком, расположенным в центре Англии, чуть ближе к югу. Оксфорд – это административный центр графства Оксфордшира. Здесь протекают реки Темза и Черуэлл. Население Оксфорда немногочисленно – примерно 120 тысяч человек. Довольно много здесь студентов, местных англичан и приезжих из-за рубежа – их количество примерно составляет 30 тысяч жителей.
О происхождении города до сих пор толкуют историки, основываясь на разных рукописях и хрониках. В англосаксонских хрониках первое упоминание об Оксфорде датируется примерно 912 годом, в то время, когда правил Эдуард I.
С 10 века нашей эры Европа постепенно начала программу образования. Университеты появлялись во Франции, Италии, Испании. Только в Англии «процветала» неграмотность. Тогда саксонский король Альфред Великий приказал создать университет. Вначале в нем учились только представители духовенства, но затем университет начал принимать студентов из других стран.

Оксфорд – уютный, ухоженный городок с красивыми парками, аккуратно подстриженными ярко-зелеными лужайками и пышными клумбами с цветами. Характерный архитектурный стиль для Оксфорда, как, впрочем, и для большей части Европы, - это готика. Тонкие шпили, устремленные ввысь, мозаика на окнах католических церквей, особая утонченность и изысканность – это самые характерные готические черты, которые олицетворяют стремление человека к Богу.
Поскольку Оксфорд – город с богатой историей, жители чтут его историю и уважают свой дом. Большинство зданий здесь остались практически неизменными со средневековых времен. Если вы совершите автобусную экскурсию, вы в наиболее полной мере сможете ощутить дух древности. Туристов здесь развозят специальные двухъярусные автобусы. Вы будете располагаться на верхнем ярусе под открытым небом. Такая прогулка станет для вас незабываемой.

Оксфорд, с красивыми величественными зданиями и приятной для глаз природой, станет прекрасным объектом для тех, кто любит фотографировать. Каждый уголок здесь заслуживает внимания. Здесь даже располагались съемочные площадки некоторых фильмов, в частности, и о Гарри Поттере. Возле одного их таких колледжей всегда толпится народ. Отстояв где-то час в очереди, вы сможете посмотреть на те места, где проводили свое время герои этого фильма. Колледжи города можно посетить только за деньги. Но если вам повезет, вас бесплатно проведет какой-нибудь приятель-студент такого ВУЗа.
В городе насчитывается много архитектурных памятников, на которые стоит взглянуть. Прежде всего, это, конечно, Оксфордский университет. Он является международным образовательным и исследовательским центром. В его состав включено 41 колледж. Самыми старыми является Баллиол и Мертон, самым крупным считается Кембл. В центре Оксфорда расположена Озерная школа, которая стоит совсем рядом с колледжем Ворсестер. Здесь также находится здание Бизнес-школы Оксфордского университета. Стоит только перечислить всех тех людей, которым посчастливилось здесь учиться и окончить колледжи, чтобы понять всю значимость образовательной системы здесь: Льюис Кэрролл, Оскар Уальд, Перси Шелли, Адам Смит, Джонатан Свифт, Маргарет Тэтчер, Индира Ганди.
Еще одной достопримечательностью является Башня Магдален – центральное строение колледжа Магдален, который был основан в 1458 году. Она также выполнена в готическом стиле, характерном для Великобритании. Здесь существует традиция: 1 мая каждый год хор колледжа устраивает торжественное песнопение. Евхаристический гимн 17 века в его исполнении прозвучит не позже шести часов утра, поэтому вам стоит встать пораньше, чтобы услышать эти прекрасные звуки. Башня Магдален и мост Магдален являются символом города.
Если вы будете в Оксфорде, стоит посетить и музей Эшмолин, который был основан в 1683 году по требованию королевской семьи. Он единственный был отрыт для свободного посещения. Здесь выставляли свои работы бедные художники, которые надеялись получить славу и известностью. В настоящее время в этом музее выставлены знаменитые произведения Рембрандта, Леонардо да Винчи, Микеланджело, Рафаэля и других маститых художников.
Оксфордский собор является всего лишь маленькой часовней, а точнее, самой маленькой в Англии. Она относилась к владениям «Церкви Христа». Однако именно здесь в 13 веке Святой Георгий был провозглашен покровителем Англии.
Неподалеку от церкви св. Девы Марии находится Радклиф Камера – круглое здание с куполом, которое являлось читальным залом знаменитой Бодлианской библиотеки. Эта библиотека, одна из крупнейших во всем мире, насчитывает около двух млн. томов.
Еще одно интересное место, куда стоит заглянуть – это Ботанический сад. Он был основан в 1621 году. Здесь находится огромная коллекция растений со всего мира. Здесь занимались изучением лекарственных растений.

Для кулинарных гурманов здесь также есть, чем удовлетворить душу и желудок. Внешний вид многих ресторанчиков внешне очень напоминает старинный стиль, и это не случайно. Англичане, подобно, коммунистам, в одно время начали активно перестраивать церкви в различные развлекательные учреждения и заведения общественного питания. Но сервис и меню от этого не проиграли. В пабах существует отличный выбор напитков, расширенное меню, включающее в себя изысканные морепродукты. Вообще в Оксфорде можно попробовать не только традиционную английскую кухню. Здесь представлены все виды кулинарного творчества Европы и даже немного больше. В ресторане Taste of India вы сможете отведать блюда, приготовленные по индийским рецептам, и, кстати, совсем недорого. А в ресторане du Liban вы познакомитесь с лучшими творениями турецкой и арабской кухни. Здесь удовлетворят запросы даже приверженца вегетарианства.

Чтобы насладиться культурной жизнью города, можно посетить Оксфордский театр. Здесь проходят новые мюзиклы и пьесы до их премьеры в Лондоне. Любителям кинематографа можно посоветовать сходить в кинотеатр «Феникс». А тем, кто предпочитает проводить время в ночных клубах, следует отправиться в клуб «Escape», выдержанный в марокканском стиле, или «The Bridge». Кстати, последний предпочитают поклонники R&B-течения, хип-хопа и соул-мьюзик. В клубе «Viva Salsa» можно принять участие в обучении танцам с лучшими приглашенными ди-джеями.

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